Business CoachingCoachingResilience

Unleash your Power at Interviews

Little did we know that ‘pivot’ would be one of the most used words of 2020.  Businesses have had to recalculate long-established income streams and revise processes overnight.  Employees have had to adjust their working practices.  All of us have had to completely rethink most elements of our lives: social, personal, working, financial, education, child-care, family gatherings, community events, sport, networking, travel and the work/life juggle.

As businesses close and new opportunities emerge, I have no doubt workforce planners will look back at this time as being one of huge movement of people in the labour market.

People who have never had to rethink their career or do job interviews are now faced with this challenge.  Pilots, educators, sales people, those in the hospitality industry and many others are now re-doing CVs and going through the arduous process of interviews.

This week I gave a talk on Resilience to a group of almost 100 people, the vast majority of whom are uncertain about their employment prospects or seeking work.  Some of the questions I received included how to remain resilient in the face of continuous ‘failures’ to secure work via interviews.

I answered the overall themes as best I could.  I only wished I could have had time with each person on a one-to-one basis to really delve into their efforts, their strengths and what might be blocking them.

There is one recommendation that I give to my coaching clients when helping them prepare for interview or business opportunities.  Some think it’s radical.  Others don’t think it’s the right approach as they are afraid it will backfire.

But clients who struggle with under-confidence always light up at the prospect of unleashing this mindset power at interviews.

And it’s this:

I ask them to adopt an attitude – somewhere in their head and mindset – that they are secretly ‘interviewing’ prospective employers at interview as much as they are being interviewed themselves.

Question to ask themselves include:

  • Is this person going to be a good manager or boss?
  • Do this company’s values fit my own values?
  • Is this a good place to work?
  • Is this company deserving of my skills and value-add?

This has the following benefits:

  1. It helps to increase their inner confidence,
  2. It can help speed up acceptance and sometimes even gratitude if the job is not secured, if it truly was not right for them in the grand scheme of things.
  3. It helps them to identify the kind of place they do want to work in so they can be more focused and target those companies.

This can also be applied for business owners who are selecting new suppliers or trade partners.  Is the deal going to be beneficial?  If not, is it possible to hold out for a supplier or market that will work?  Will they pay invoices on time?  Will they deliver on time?  Will this serve my business or will I spend too much time chasing payments or deliveries?

Necessity may mean you have to take what you can get in the moment.  But, actually, that can give you a firmer footing financially so that you can continue interviewing.  If your last job turned out to be not ‘guaranteed’ for life, neither is your service to any employer who is difficult to work for.  The jobs market may be tight, but there is still only one you in the world, so make sure you work for someone who deserves your time and knowledge, either now, or as soon as you can.

Until next week, take care,

Lisa.